HPHT Diamonds And What It Means

HPHT or High Pressure High Temperature is a treatment that can be used to make diamonds change color. The experience I have with this treatment is turning brown diamonds into white diamonds. Not all diamonds are eligible for this treatment. The best case scenario is a large dark brown diamond. This diamond needs to be type IIA. The are various methods to test whether your diamond is type IIA or not. The stone also has to be vs or better. Once your stone is treatable, you send it away for treatment, then to G.I.A. On the bottom of your GIA certificate it will notate that the stone has been subjected to hpht. If you have a very brown diamond it can be colorless, lighter brown stones are typically near colorless. There is quite a lot of risk in the hpht process. Stones can be broken, especially fancy shapes. The problem with treating stones with this process is, it’s very hard to tell the difference between natural white diamonds and hpht diamonds. Some people use the hpht process to defraud there buyer. As some of the buyers of these stones use them for the same reason. Obviously with a colorless hpht diamond you get the gorgeous look of a natural white diamond without the price. G.I.A. always catches the treatment and notated it on the certificate. However, companies such as E.G.L. don’t always catch the treatment and therefore an E.G.L. certificate would make mention of the treatment. Generally those diamonds would be used to defraud a buyer. I have a friend in the business that bought a 10ct round diamond with no certificate. He graded it as a K color. Sent it to G.I.A. and got the K but the stone was hpht. He obviously lost a lot of money on the deal. Bottom line, I believe that if you want a big gorgeous diamond on a budget. Hpht is the way to go. It represents great value. I don’t love the concept because it is known to be used to defraud people when the treatment is not disclosed. Please comment or add to what I have missed.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Advertisements
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Your Thoughts:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: